Oksana Zabuzhko, Opening speech at the 4th international literature festival 26.09.2018

Oksana ZABUZHKO

Opening speech at the 4th international literature festival at 26.09.2018

House of Scientists, Odesa

English translation by: Ali Kinsella

Dear friends, readers, and colleagues! Ladies and gentlemen!

The organizers have asked me to say a few words of salutation at this year’s festival, for which I am sincerely grateful. For the first time in my life, I feel like I am greeting a ship coming into port.

The feeling is apprehensive, yet somehow, in some way familiar, as if from a forgotten film or dream: You stand on the wharf, the wind from the sea tousles your hair, a concert band (for full effect) plays behind you, the crowd is anxious—and here comes the ship into the bay. It’s one of the most beautiful sights in the word. There’s movement and commotion on deck: The chains are clanging, the anchor falls, the ladders are coming out. And the ship’s cargo, to which the crew (that is, the festival organizing committee) has devoted sleepless nights and countless hours of work so that it may arrive at its destination, is finally brought forth from the cabins and the hold for the public; it becomes visible.

Ukrainians are a maritime people, so it’s no surprise that this image was lurking within me—on the firmware of collective unconscious—to be activated right here and now in Odessa. For Odessa is undoubtedly a magical city: a city of mixed heritage, a city of Surzhyk, like all Mediterranean cities from Casablanca to Istanbul. The blood of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and the Republic of Genoa, of the Crimean Khanate and the Zaporizhian Sich have mixed in its sleepy veins along with half a dozen now extinct state formations varying in degree of antiquity and mythologizing. And such cities, just like high-born beauties, continue to enchant even when all that remains of their former beauty is wrinkles and ruins for the simple reason that they are inexhaustible. The concentration of stories in one square kilometer here has always exceeded human ability to tell them. For nearly the entire last century, Odessa, and Ukraine in general, was furthermore denied the opportunity to speak for itself in all its own, natural voices. Rather than the cultural polyphony native to these shores, a monody was imposed on it, and now the scope of the untold that has accumulated in the meantime teases it like the invisible vestiges of the Khadzhibey Fortress, which it is said lie two meters deep somewhere beneath Prymorsky Boulevard in the the middle of downtown like a treasure under the floor of an old house. No more than a month ago, the newspapers informed us that thanks to ground-penetrating radar, it was finally possible to determine its exact location, and new debates about the city’s history broke out in Odessa: Did the city start with the destruction of the castle (which would make it a very young two-hundred years old), or with its first written mention (immediately making it six-hundred years old), or perhaps from the construction of the castle (in which case, the castle would need to be dug up to ascertain the precise age)? Despite the surrealism of the plot (are there many cities in Europe that don’t know for sure how old they are, two-hundred years or six?), no one can deny that this is precisely that magic that leaves no writer indifferent: This is literature in fluenti, in the process of being created, where Odessa is at once the hero and the author who decides what the hero should be. It is precisely this state of unfinished myth-making that makes the city the ideal humus for literature, regardless of how many writers have been born here and how many have left.

I understand why the most recent Odessa novel, written by the young Odessan Ivan Kozlenko and published just last year, takes its title, Tangier, from the William Burroughs epigraph. And why, in the book, our day and age is stitched together with the extinct 1920s and the “Ukrainian Hollywood” of the Odessa Film Studio, where unjustly forgotten geniuses worked alongside the authors of other, also unjustly forgotten Odessa novels. To this day, the museum at the Odessa Film Studio does not mention anyone whom the Soviet authorities had identified in their day as untrustworthy. Their disembodied shadows now rustle around in that space in vain, pretending to be sycamore leaves underfoot. So a whole throng of them readily invades a text that is open to them, rushing to speak after all these decades of silence, choking the text, tearing the film, demanding footnotes, and in this way creating what is either a remake of the 1920s or what in the future might become the “new Odessa style,” but which for now best conveys this state of unfinished myth-making.

And I, although in no way an Odessan, also have my own shadows here. These are my literary forebears whom I now imagine standing behind me like an excited crowd at a celebration, here at the Odessa port to greet our festival ship. One hundred years ago in spring 1918, the seven-year-old son of a midshipman’s helper strolled here with his mother, staring at the new flags on the ships of the Ukrainian fleet. Later, he, Mykhailo Stelmakh, became a writer with a tragic fate of his own, never mind that he was a Soviet laureate and a recipient of orders. After the defeat of the Ukrainian National Republic and the arrival of the Bolsheviks, the Stelmakh family fled Odessa for the interior, pretending to be peasants, and the writer lived with this scrubbed biography his whole life. That is, until in the 1970s, when a wave of repressions against the Ukrainian intelligentsia threatened to again cast into the hinterlands—not him, this time, but my parents from Kiev—that he deployed all his authority as a laureate to save our family. It is to him that I owe both the first foreword to my still childish poems and my first publications. In my mind, I’m standing up straight, sensing Stelmakh’s presence behind me; I know he would have been ineffably pleased to see his hometown as the final port of call for a landing party of international writers.

A bit earlier yet, 105 years ago, a woman in a white hat and black lace arm warmers (there is a photo) took her final walk along Lanzheron Beach. By her pedigree, she was perhaps the most “Mediterranean” writer of the 20th century—my beloved Lesya Ukrainka, in whose worldly biography Odessa, to be fair, remained an unrealized project (at one time, she hoped to become the editor of the local newspaper Yuzhnye zapiski [Southern notes] and seriously considered moving here with her husband). But in her texts, always facing the sea, a careful reader will recognize the scent of the acacias here, the Khadzhibey Estuary, the Shabo grapes, and even the famous catacombs she descended into with her Odessa friends. Without a doubt, the Roman catacombs that hide the heroine of her dramas on the history of early Christianity came from here, from Odessa. Who, if not she, our great “Europeanizer,” who in her plays and poems rewrote all of European mythology from a woman’s point of view—from the Trojan War (in Cassandra) to the chivalric romances and legends of Don Juan (in The Stone Host)—could take greater joy from the fact that the city in which, as a young girl, she made plans to translate Western literature into the forbidden Ukrainian and with her girlfriends did translate Maupassant, Hauptmann, and Leconte de Lisle, has for the fourth year in a row now welcomed a festival of new contemporary writers who represent twelve world literatures?

One more character: In that very same 1913, one of the long-standing pillars of the Odessan literary scene, Mykhailo Komarov, publisher, critic, bibliographer, and owner of a unique Ukrainian library, which he left to the city of Odessa—although Odessa was not able to preserve it, just as it could not even preserve his grave (the Second Christian Cemetery where he was buried was destroyed by the Bolsheviks, and out of the entire large Komarov family, of seven children, only one son, Bohdan, survived, who, without waiting for an extension, fled to Tajikistan after his first exile)—stared out at the sea for the last time. Despite numerous petitions from the public, the Komarovs’ names still do not appear on the map of Odessa today, but they are all in my crowd waving and joyfully greeting our ship: the beautiful translator Marharyta-Gretkhen with her husband, a professor of mineralogy at Odessa University; the clever Liuba who studied medicine at the Sorbonne, defended her doctorate, and disappeared without a trace in 1937; Halia, the talented poet and translator who disappeared in 1938; and the aforementioned Bohdan, the outstanding botanist, the only one to die a natural death, having lived to old age without ever being rehabilitated during his life or allowed to return to Ukraine. In their youth, they all worked on making Ukraine a full participant in the intercultural dialogue, for which they were all destined to be destroyed. Therefore, regardless of the fact that their return home has taken so long, today is their holiday as well.

Why am I telling you all of this? I often get the chance to travel to literary festivals of various kinds, and I see how at all latitudes doubts are gradually growing as to the effectiveness of this format for literature’s existence—as to the festival as a cultural institution. It’s understandable: More and more people are coming to realize that we live in a time when a new world war is unfolding—you can, of course, choose not to see it. You can convince yourself that it is “somewhere far away”—in Georgia, in Syria, in Ukraine—and that “nothing like that could happen to us.” But juvenile incantations against reality are good in their time; being an adult, however, is something else. This means understanding that, without exception, whatever has already happened to someone can happen to anyone. And here a question inevitably arises: What can (could) culture do under these conditions, and why hasn’t it prepared humanity for the reality currently nipping at their heels, dully rumbling like the top of a volcano? And from there comes the unpleasant suspicion that we, perhaps, have been fooled. Did we not revel in the niches of our festivals like children at a fair with our smart conversations and good wines, forming around ourselves that which on social media is called a “filter bubble,” while beyond the borders of our niches, entire nations first stopped reading en masse and then voted for such blatant swindlers that it is truly hard to believe how it could have happened to us, we who are so beautiful and smart?

Recently, I heard a decisive verdict from my Polish friends who, for a few years now, have been unable to recover from a very cruel awakening: Basically, all these festivals are for naught if there aren’t any systematic government programs to promote reading. But my country’s experience is different. I come from a culture that, for the entire modern and post-modern age, hasn’t been able to tally even ten years of systematic state support put together, and which instead, for generation after generation, learned to survive by circumvention and in spite of all the government programs, since for the majority of history these programs were aimed against it. Paradoxically, today, under conditions of global crisis, this seems like rather decent training in Realpolitik (do what you can, and it is what it is!). It is no accident that in the country’s “peaceful” territories, today’s Russian-Ukrainian War revolves around a burst of cultural activity and simply feverish revival of festival life. Ukrainians are used to seeing every available form of communication (and there’s no sense in denying that the literary festival has communication as its goal) as an advantage in itself, a sort of seed for a Maidan. For wherever people gather united by common values, the reign of swindlers ends. And only where there is an exchange of living human energies is there a chance to give birth to something new. So we are not simply having a festival, we are building horizontal ties in society beyond extant institutions—we’re investing in the future.

So it is with my whole heart that I applaud the brilliant German-Swiss cultural intuition that a few years ago gave birth to the idea of bringing a beautiful, hand-selected ship of world literature to the Ukrainian shores of the Black Sea every year. Odessa needs this ship. And this ship needs Odessa.

Good luck!

 

Author´s voices on ILO 4

Anushka Ravishankar (India)

A huge thank you for inviting me to the festival. I had a wonderful time, both with the children at my sessions and with the other authors, translators and moderators. It was a very enriching and stimulating few days.

I had one session at the Puppet Theatre and two at schools. There were 150 children at the Theatre where we had a most interesting conversation about monsters under beds. We also sang some silly songs.

Both the school sessions were wonderful, with bright children, full of curiosity and enthusiasm. The second one, at school no 64, Malinovski Str., stood out for the involvement of the teachers. The children asked excellent questions. They were excited, engaged and responsive. It couldn’t get more rewarding for a children’s author! Children at both schools asked if they could get a Ukrainian version of the book. I’m in the process, therefore, of trying to contact a publisher there. Hope it works out!

A special mention for the actor who was doing the readings. I couldn’t understand a word, of course, but I could see that he was doing a great job from the reactions of the children and I could sense that he was really connecting with them.

Thank you once again, for inviting me. This is such an important festival, and I’m honoured to have been a part of it.

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Volodymyr Kadenko (Ukraine)

Huge thanks for wonderful days in Odessa!

 

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Meg Rosoff (US/UK)

Thank you for a really wonderful few days in Odessa. The festival had such an incredibly warm and friendly atmosphere, and I loved meeting the other authors.

It was beautifully organised and you were so helpful — it was altogether a brilliant experience.

I felt really privileged to be invited to Odessa.

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Program for 25.09.2018

Wolf Biermann´ songs released in Russian for ILO 4!

Download the PDF file .

The program of 4th international literature festival odessa

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we are pleased to announce the preliminary program of the 4th international literature festival odessa!

25 09 – 30 09 2018

FREE ADMISSION TO ALL EVENTS!

24 SEPTEMBER │ MONDAY

PRESS Centre »ODESIT«

11.00 PRESS CONFERENCE

[IN COOPERATION WITH THE DEPARTMENT FOR CULTURE AND TOURISM OF THE ODESSA CITY COUNCIL]

25 SEPTEMBER │ THURSDAY

POTEMKIN STAIRS [in case of bad weather: Terminal 42]

16 30- 18 00

SERHIY ZHADAN UKRAINE│»THE WORLD IS A HANDKERCHIEF« POEMS BY PEDRO LENZ

The poet Serhiy Zhadan, who has received many accolades for his work, has been a major figure of Kharkiv’s dynamic literary scene since 1992. He is also a literary translator and will read his translation of poems by the Swiss poet Pedro Lenz who writes mostly in dialect. They were published in Ukraine under the title »Moi drug mashinist krana« [tr: My Friend Drives a Crane].

[Ukrainian/Swiss-German]

POTEMKIN STAIRS [in case of bad weather: Terminal 42]

18 00 – 20 00

WOLF AND PAMELA BIERMANN GERMANY│Concert

The poet and songwriter Wolf Biermann, who was exiled from the GDR as a dissident in 1976 and later participated in the peace and anti-nuclear movement in West Germany, has often performed in protest of contempt shown to fundamental democratic values. He and Pamela Biermann will present familiar songs spanning 50 years of German history. »Wolf Biermann has contributed a piece of the German identity« [Helmut Schmidt].

[German]

POTEMKIN STAIRS [in case of bad weather: Terminal 42]

20 00 – 23 00

ZHADAN I SOBAKI UKRAINE│»MALVI«

Steeped in history, the steps to the Black Sea, made famous by Eisenstein’s film »Battleship Potemkin«, is where the concert by the punk band Zhadan i Sobaki, which was founded in 2007, will take place. The band which is one of the most well-known in Ukraine, addresses subjects such as suburban identity, politics, liberalism, national issues and global topics.

Drums — Vitaliy Bronishevs’kyy

Bass — Andriy Pyvovarov

Guitar — Yevheniy Turchynov

Keyboards — Serhiy Kulayenko

Trumpet — Artem Dmytrychenkov

Trombone — Oleksandr Merenchuk

Vocal Lead — Serhiy Zhadan

Sound producer — Stanislav Bronishevs’kyy

[Ukrainian]

26 SEPTEMBER │ WEDNESDAY

ODESSA REGIONAL PUPPET THEATRE

09 00 – 10 30

MEG ROSOFF UK/US│»How I Live Now«

In her bestseller »How I Live Now« [2004], Meg Rosoff tells the story of first love and offers a menacing and hazy image of a world turned upside-down. The novel made Rosoff famous overnight and has been awarded myriad prizes.

Moderator: MAYA DIMERLY

Ages: 14-16

Speaker: NINEL NATOCHA

[English/Ukrainian]

ODESSA REGIONAL PUPPET THEATRE

12 00 – 13 30

YURIY BEDRYK UKRAINE│»Dreamcatchers«

In his books, Yuriy Bedryk combines poetic imagery with a child’s lively, creative thinking. He will read poems from »Snjus-njus-njus« [tr: »I dream, I dream«] and »Tjotja Begemotja« [tr: »Aunt Hippopotamus«] as well as poems and tonguetwisters from the as yet unpublished manuscript »Sinozawrikam i diplodozjam« [»tr: Dreamcatchers«].

Moderator: HALYNA DOLNYK

Ages: 6 – 9

[Ukrainian]

TERMINAL 42

16 00 – 17 00

SAMUEL SHIMON IRAK/UK│ »BAGHDAD NOIR«

Samuel Shimon will read from the anthology »Baghdad Noir«, a collection of 14 texts that are each dedicated to a certain district or place in the Iraqi capital. The anthology is a portrait of one of the world’s most war-torn cities; most of the stories are set after the US’ invasion of Iraq in 2003.

Moderator: JURKO PROHASKO

Speaker: DIANA MALA

[English/Ukrainian]

TERMINAL 42

17 00 – 18 30

WITOLD SZABLOWSKI POLAND│»Righteous Traitors«

Witold Szabłowski will read from his book »Sprawiedliwi zdrajcy« [2016; tr: Righteous Traitors], which has been translated into Ukrainian. The book examines the1943 Volhynia massacre, in which Ukrainians murdered over 100,000 Polish civilians in Nazi German-occupied Poland. Szabłowski found the last eyewitnesses in today’s Ukraine and asked which Ukrainians helped their Polish neighbours escape.

SERHIJ OSOKA UKRAINE│»Skinny-Dipping in August«

In his volume of short prose »Nichni kupannja v serpni« [tr: »Skinny-Dipping in August«], Serhiy Osoka will explore existential experiences such as hunger, ageing, illness, weakness, hopelessness and alienation. He presents an excerpt here, which discusses Odessa’s eye clinic.

Moderator: JURKO PROHASKO

Speaker: MAKSYM LINNYK

[English/Ukrainian]

TERMINAL 42

18 30 – 19 30

Speak, Memory! I:

JURKO PROHASKO UKRAINE │JOSEPH ROTH: »HOTEL SAVOY«

The Austro-Hungarian writer and journalist Joseph Roth [1894 – 1939] will be remembered by the literary scholar, author, and translator Jurko Prohasko, who translated Roth’s novel about the end of an era »Hotel Savoy« [1924], »Hiob« [1930, tr.: Job] and »Das falsche Gewicht« [1937, tr.: Weights and Measures] into Ukrainian.

[Ukrainian/English]

HOUSE OF SCIENTISTS

20 00 FESTIVAL OPENING

OPENING SPEECH: OKSANA ZABUZHKO

[English/German/Ukrainian]

27 SEPTEMBER │ THURSDAY

ODESSA REGIONAL PUPPET THEATRE

09 00 – 10 30

BETTE WESTERA THE NETHERLANDS│»DEAD SIMPLE«

Bette Westera’s poetry collection »Doodgewoon« [2014; tr: »Dead Simple«] is aimed at children aged 8-10 and openly addresses the topic of death and all the emotions that go along with it. Even if grief and resignation are clearly labeled as such, thanks to the author’s humor, this is not a grim, but rather a comforting book that presents death as a constant and unavoidable part of life.

Moderator: MAYA DIMERLY

Ages: 8–10

Speaker: NINEL NATOCHA

[English/Ukrainian]

ODESSA REGIONAL PUPPET THEATRE

10 30 – 12 00

ANUSHKA RAVISHANKAR INDIA│»MOIN AND THE MONSTER«

One evening, Moin discovers a monster under his bed. From then on, the boy must live with him, which is not so easy – the monster eats only bananas, sings curious songs, and is constantly trying out new hairstyles. So Moin decides to send the monster back to where it came from. Writing with a unique sense of children’s humour, Ravishankar »captivates with dialogue and wit« [»NZZ«].

Moderator: MAYA DIMERLY

Ages: 6–9

Speaker: VADIM GOLOVKO

[English/Ukrainian]

ODESSA REGIONAL PUPPET THEATRE

12 00 – 13 30

OLEKSANDR DERMANSKIY UKRAINE│»MALYAKA-THE PRINCESS OF DRAKONIA«

The well-known children’s writer Sashko Dermanskiy, whose books have been recommended for classrooms numerous times by the Ukrainian ministry for education, will read from »Malyaka – prynzessa Drakonii«: In dragon school, Drago and Pipchik learn how to recognize a princess – and how to devour her! They set off on a search for Princess Malyaka. But how will they recognize her if they have never seen her before?

Moderator: DANYLO ILNYTSJKYI

Ages: 8–9

[Ukrainian]

LITERATURE MUSEUM ⸰ GOLDEN HALL

15 00 – 16 30

VOLODYMYR KADENKOUKRAINE │»School Attendant«

The Isaac Babel Prize was founded in Odessa last year to reward exceptional works of contemporary Russian-language literature from Ukraine, Russia and other countries. The prize was founded by the World-Wide Club of Odessites. The writer Valeriy Khait, a co-founder of the prize and jury member, will talk about the goals, results and resonance of the Isaac Babel Prize. This year’s winner, Volodymyr Kadenko, will read from his story »Dezhurny po shkole« [tr.: »School Attendant«].

Moderator: VALERIY KHAIT

[English/Russian]

LITERATURE MUSEUM ⸰ GOLDEN HALL

16 30 – 18 00

OKSANA ZABUZHKO UKRAINE │»After the third call the entrance to the hall is prohibited«

At her reading, Oksana Zabuzhko will present a text from her story collection »After the third call the entrance to the hall is prohibited«. This volume combines early stories along with later masterpieces, which have since been translated into many languages, and laid the foundation for feminist autobiographical prose in Ukraine.

FILIP FLORIAN ROMANIA│»ALL THE OWLS«

In his most recent novel »Toate bufniţele« [2013; tr: All the Owls], Filip Florian tells the story of two unequal friends who explore the wild and mythical landscape of the Carpathian Mountainss and learn the language of the owls. Flashbacks to 20th-century Romania show up in the biographies of the two protagonists and mirror the sensitive experiences of childhood in a politically-repressed country.

Moderator: JURKO PROHASKO

Speaker: DIANA MALA

[English/Ukrainian]

LITERATURE MUSEUM ⸰ GOLDEN HALL

18 00 – 20 00

WOLF BIERMANN GERMANY│»DON’T WAIT FOR BETTER TIMES!«

Seldom have personal fate and German history been so tightly woven together as in the life of songwriter and poet Wolf Biermann who, as Helmut Schmidt said, »has contributed a piece of German identity«. In his autobiography, »Warte nicht auf bessre Zeiten!« [tr. Don’t Wait for Better Times!], Biermann describes his life between East and West Germany as well as that of his Communist Jewish father, who was murdered at Auschwitz, and his mother, who rescued him from the inferno of bombed and burning Hamburg.

Moderator: JURKO PROHASKO

Speaker: NINEL NATOCHA

[German/Ukrainian]

TERMINAL 42

19 00 – 20 30

ROLF HOSFELD GERMANY│Karl Marx and the 19th Century

One of the preeminent Germans of the 19th century, Karl Marx had a decisive impact on the world’s modern way of thinking. Rolf Hosfeld will offer an insight into the philosopher’s world of thought, addressing his speculative misconceptions as well as his still-challenging discoveries and describing his eventful life. He will present his award-winning book »Karl Marx: An Intellectual Biography« [New York Oxford,2013].

Moderator: DANYLO ILNYTSKYI

[English/Ukrainian]

LITERATURE MUSEUM ⸰ GOLDEN HALL

20 00 – 21 30

POETRY NIGHT I: VERA PAVLOVA RUSSIA/USA GERHARD FALKNER GERMANY SAMUEL SHIMON IRAQ/UK

Vera Pavlova’s poetic texts, which have been translated into 20 languages, turn traditional idioms upside down and showcase the sounds of the words in new expressions.

Gerhard Falkner is known for his old-fashioned poems, his ways of overwriting, his mixing of different registers, and the distortion of sounds. He will read from the cooperative publication »Ignatien – Elegien am Rande des Nervenzusammenbruchs« [Ignatias – Elegies on the Edge of a Nervous Breakdown].

After settling in Paris in 1985, Samuel Shimon and his publishing house Gilgamesh Editions released a series of volumes of Arab poetry and prose, including his own collection of poems »Old Boy« [1987], and »The Assyrian Boy« [2018] from which he will present selected texts.

Moderator: JURKO PROHASKO

Speaker: DIANA MALA

[English/Ukrainian]

28 SEPTEMBER │ FRIDAY

ODESSA REGIONAL PUPPET THEATRE

08 00 – 08 50

Larysa Kozlovska, a public figure since 2016, is a winner of numerous prizes and a founder of Zoriana Khvylia, a television contest for children performers and storytellers. The contest has become one of the most famous performance and storytelling contests in Ukraine. Children from different ethnic groups perform and recite works by Ukrainian and foreign authors in a range of languages, displaying the multicultural society of Odessa and the surrounding region.

Moderator: SVITLANA LUKINA | Ages: 6-15

Performers: Winners and laureates of Zoriana Khvylia (tr. Television Contest for Children Performers and Storytellers).

Languages: English/Ukrainian/Russian

 

ODESSA REGIONAL PUPPET THEATRE

09 00 – 10 30

VOLODYMYR RUTKIVSKYİ UKRAINE│»GUESTS ON BROOMS«

The children’s writer and poet Volodymyr Rutkivskyi, whose popular adventure trilogy »Džuri« was adapted for film in 2016, will present his fairy tale »Gäste auf Besen« [tr. Guests on Brooms], which was nominated for the 2017 Andersen Prize in Ukraine: With the help of her cat, an old witch is tasked with kidnapping a little girl from her home village and forcing her to be her apprentice. But she goes a little too far…

Moderator: DANYLO ILNYTSKYI

Ages: 9 – 11

[Ukrainian]

ODESSA REGIONAL PUPPET THEATRE

10 30 – 12 00

OLEKSANDR HAVROSH UKRAINE│ »FAIRY TALES IN LOVE«

Oleksandr Havrosh will explorethe genre of the fairy tale, which has existed since ancient times, and not only as a form of written art, but also as an oral tradition. He will read from his work »Fairy Tales in Love«.

Moderator: HALYNA DOLNYK

Ages: 8 – 12

[Ukrainian]

LITERATURE MUSEUM ⸰ GOLDEN HALL

17 00 – 18 30

ROLF HOSFELD GERMANY │The Armenian Genocide. A European Catastrophe

In »Tod in der Wüste: Der Völkermord an den Armeniern« [München, 2015; tr: Death in the Desert: The Genocide of the Armenians], Hosfeld explores the first genocide of the 20th century, which began in the spring of 1915. Today, the journalist, filmmaker, and editor is the scientific director of the Lepsiushaus in Potsdam, an institute for genocide research.

Moderator:  DANYLO INNYTSKYI

[English/Russian]

Terminal 42

17 00 – 18 30

VIKTOR EROFEYEV RUSSIA│ »THE GAP«

In his most recent book »Shel« [tr: The Gap] the Nabokov Prize-winner Viktor Erofeyev asks questions of existence, analysing the limits of belief and knowledge, death and immortality, reason and madness, and love and cynicism, offering a new perspective on Chekhov, the Marquis de Sade, Rimbaud, as well as other European writers.

GYÖRGY DALOS HUNGARY/ GERMANY│»My Grandmother’s Skirt«

The historian and prize-winning writer György Dalos reflects on »Anecdotes from the 1950s« and reads from his story collection »Der Rock meiner Großmutter« [1997; tr: My Grandmother’s Skirt] in which he attempts to reconstruct his family’s fragmented and conflicting legends, and in which his individual experiences and feelings are closely intertwined with political matters.

Moderator: OSTAP SLYVYNSKY

Speaker: DIANA MALA

[German/Russian]

LITERATURE MUSEUM ⸰ GOLDEN HALL

18 30 – 20 00

ANNE THOMAS GERMANY │Bringing back names with STOLPERSTEINE

Since 1992, Gunter Demnig’s »Stolpersteine« have commemorated the people who were persecuted, forced into exile, driven to suicide and murdered by the National Socialists. There are already a few of these moving, quadratic brass-plated cement blocks in Ukraine – in Pereiaslav, Rivne and Chernivtsi.

Moderator: DANYLO INNYTSKYI

[English/Ukrainian]

TERMINAL 42

18 30 – 20 00

Speak, Memory! II:

STEFAN ZWEIFEL SWITZERLAND│Sade – Rousseau – Proust: Sadomasochism as a Principle of translation

Stefan Zweifel, who had already translated numerous classics of French literature, rose to prominence with his translation of the Marquis de Sade’s major works »Justine« and »Juliette«. Using the works of Sade, Rousseau and Proust as examples, he will discuss sadomasochism as one of the principles of translation.

Moderator: OSTAP SLYVYNSKY

[German/Russian]

LITERATURE MUSEUM ⸰ GOLDEN HALL

20 00 – 21 30

SASCHA MARIANNA SALZMANN GERMANY│»Beside Myself«

Salzmann’s debut novel »Außer sich« [tr: Beside Myself], which was nominated for the 2017 German Book Prize, tells the story of one family over four generations, moving between the Soviet Union, post-reunification Germany and modern Turkey and exploring the boundaries of the self, of language and the world. Salzmann will read from a chapter set in Odessa.

Moderator: JULIA POMOHAIBO

Speaker: DIANA MALA

[German/Russian]

Terminal 42

20 00 – 21 30

POETRY NIGHT II: CHRISTIAN UETZ SWITZERLAND OKSANA ZABUZHKO UKRAINE BORIS KHERSONSKY UKRAINE

In his poetry collection »Engel der Illusion« [2018; tr: Angel of Illusion] Christian Uetz again proves himself to be a master of dynamic, vivid language, linking philosophy with eroticism. Playful and commanding, the poems circle important themes about the existence of the other in oneself, about presence and absence and negativity and transcendence.

Oksana Zabuzhko, who is primarily known for her essays and novels, is one of the most important female writers in Ukraine today. She will present her poetic work » Diptych From the Year 2008«.

Boris Khersonsky, who recently received considerable attention for his »open diary« on the Ukraine crisis, will present his new poems.

Moderator: Vasyl Lozynksi

Speaker: VADIM GOLOVKO

[German/Russian]

29 SEPTEMBER │ SATURDAY

Terminal 42

13 30 – 15 00

EVGENIY GOLUBOVSKY UKRAINE

BOOK PRESENTATION: »Don’t Judge the Black Sheep«

[IN COOPERATION WITH THE WORLD-WIDE CLUB OF ODESSITES]

The Ukrainian journalist and cultural scholar Evgeny Golubovsky has written numerous texts about the history and culture of the city of Odessa. He is also the director of the literature studio »Zeljonaja lampa« [tr: Green Lamp] and will present the book »Ne sudite chornykh ovec« [tr: Don’t Judge the Black Sheep], a collection of texts by 12 of its authors.

[Russian/English]

Terminal 42

15 00 – 16 30

INTERNATIONAL TRANSLATION DAY

On the occasion of the feast of St. Jerome, which is dedicated to the work of literary translators, Stefan Zweifel will offer an introduction to modern literary translation. Boris Khersonsky will read his new translations of Zviad Ratiani’s poems. Maya Dimerly will present translations of »Ten Nights of Dreams« by the famous Japanese poet Natsume Sōseki [1867 – 1916].

Moderation: ANNA KOSTENKO

[German/Russian]

Terminal 42

16 30 – 18 00

MARENTE DE MOOR THE NETHERLANDS│»Foon«

In Marente de Moor’s most recent novel »Foon« [2018], a couple of once enthusiastic biologists, who live in a remote house in the Russian forest and run a home for orphaned bear cubs, puzzle over a dark sound from nature. Removed from civilisation, they gradually learn how to identify with their dependants and the animal kingdom to which they belong, as well as with history.

MELINDA NADJ ABONJI SWITZERLAND│»Tortoise Soldier«

»Schildkrötensoldat« [2017; tr: Tortoise Soldier] is set in 1990s Serbia and tells the story of a dreamy young man who grows up in poverty and is sent to the army by his helpless parents. His experiences are an ordeal. With poetic and vivid language, Abonji shows a restrictive system that crushes and destroys those who do not conform.

Moderator: OSTAP SLYVINSKY

Speaker: NINEL NATOCHA

[German/Russian]

LITERATURE MUSEUM ⸰ GOLDEN HALL

17 00 – 18 30

FELICITAS HOPPE GERMANY

»PRAVDA: An American Journey«

In her most recent novel »Prawda. Eine amerikanische Reise« [2018; tr: Pravda: An American Journey], Felicitas Hoppe takes a fantasy-filled and symbolic journey through literary America, on the trail of the cult Russian writers Ilf and Petrov, from Boston to San Francisco, on to Los Angeles and back to New York.

LIUBKO DERESH UKRAINE│»Slowly Towards North«

Liubko Deresh has written a series of novels and numerous stories and, along with Yurii Andrukhovych and Serhiy Zhadan, is one of the most prominent representatives of post-Soviet Ukrainian literature. He will read from the long story Povilno na pivnich [tr: Slowly Towards North], which is a sequel to his debut novella Pokloninie jaschtscherice [tr: Worshipping the Lizard]. The author tries to understand Galicia at the time of transition from the Soviet era to an independent Ukraine, »Galicia-for-oneself«, fragmented and devoid of the myth of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Moderator: DANYLO ILNITSKYI

Speaker: DIANA MALA

[German/Ukrainian]

TERMINAL 42

18 00 – 19 30

DISCUSSION: Culture of Remembrance

Conversation with Anne Thomas, international coordinator of the »Stolpersteine« project and Volodymyr Viatrovych, director of the Ukrainian Institute of National Remembrance.

Moderator: GYÖRGY DALOS

[German/Ukrainian]

LITERATURE MUSEUM ⸰ GOLDEN HALL

18 30 – 20 00

JÜRG HALTER SWITZERLAND│»Waking Up in the 21st Century«

Jürg Halter’s debut novel »Erwachen im 21. Jahrhundert« [2018; tr: Waking Up in the 21st Century] is a parable of a writer who doubts both himself and the world, and who is beset by the uncomfortable questions of our time. The book is about humanity in modern times, »the most successful failed project of all time.«

MARJANA GAPONENKO UKRAINE/ GERMANY│»Who is Martha?«

»Wer ist Martha?« [tr.: Who is Martha?] is about an old ornithologist from Ukrainian Galicia who checks into a chic Vienna hotel before his anticipated death. He gets to know another old man who is also in poor health. Together, they experience some adventures. The »highly poetic picaresque novel« [Nürnberger Nachrichten] was awarded the Adelbert von Chamisso Prize.

Moderator: JULIA POMOHAIBO

Speaker: MAKSYM LINNYK

[German/Russian]

TERMINAL 42

19 30 – 21 00

Speak, Memory! III: BORIS KHERSONSKY UKRAINE│SIMON FRUG

Simon Frug [1859 – 1916] was once the idol of Jewish youth, whom he entertained with ballads, satires and ghetto and Zionist songs in Russian, Yiddishand Hebrew. The psychologist and writer Boris Khersonsky will introduce and remember the poet of the shtetl.

[Russian/English]

LITERATURE MUSEUM ⸰ GOLDEN HALL

20 00 – 21 30

ALOIS HOTSCHNIG AUSTRIA│»MAYBE THIS TIME«

In the stories of his collection »Die Kinder beruhigte das nicht« [2006; Eng. »Maybe This Time«, 2011] Alois Hotschnig plays with perception in subtle ways. The power of these stories, which have a long-lasting impact, lies in the precise and empathetic language with which Hotschnig reveals hidden connections in the seemingly familiar.

GIANNA MOLINARI SWITZERLAND│»Here, Everything is Still Possible«

»Hier ist noch alles möglich« [2018; tr: Here, Everything is Still Possible], the debut novel of Gianna Molinari, who won the 3Sat Prize for her text at the 2017 Ingeborg Bachmann competition in Klagenfurt, is about a young woman who works as a night guard in a packaging factory. A wolf is suspected of having crept onto the premises.

Moderator: DANYLO ILNITSKYI

Speaker: ARTEM MUZYCHENKO

[German/Ukrainian]

25 SEPTEMBER – 29 SEPTEMBER

ALL LOCATIONS

What matters – a film project on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

»What matters« features 30 artists and students from different countries, including Vivienne Westwood, Nina Hoss, Can Dündar, Patti Smith, Simon Rattle, Ai Weiwei, Elfriede Jelinek, and David Grossman, who each read one article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The film has so far been subtitled in the following languages: Arabic, Chinese, German, English, French, Hindi, Russian, Spanish and Turkish. It will be released around the world on the 70th anniversary of the Declaration of Human Rights on December 10th, 2018.  It has already screened at Innsbruck International Biennial of the Arts, the American Film Festival New York [TAFFNY], as part of the »MENSCHENRECHTE. MEINE RECHTE. DEINE RECHTE. AUSGELÖST!« exhibition at the German Foreign Office, at the 22nds [Auswärtiges Amt], the 03. international literaturfestival odessa and at the 23rd Leukerbad International Literary Festival.

[WITH RUSSIAN SUBTITLES]

The 4th international literature festival odessa

We are pleased to announce that the 4th international literature festival odessa will take place from 25-30 September 2018. The following writers and artists have already confirmed their attendance:

Jurij Bedryk (Ukraine)

Wolf and Pamela Biermann (Germany)

Gyoergy Dalos (Hungary)

Liubko Deresh (Ukraine)

Oleksandr Dermanko (Ukraine)

Viktor Erofeev (Russia)

Gerhard Falkner (Germany)

Filip Florian (Romania)

Jürg Halter (Switzerland)

Maryana Haponenko (Ukraine)

Felicitas Hoppe (Germany)

Rolf Hosfeld (Germany)

Alois Hotschnig  (Austria)                                                                   

Boris Khersonsky (Ukraine)

Marente de Moor (Netherlands)

Melinda Nadj Abonji (Hungary/Switzerland)

Vera Pavlova (Russia)

Meg Rosoff (USA/UK)

Volodomir Rutkivskiy (Ukraine)

Anushka Ravishankar (India)

Sascha Marianna Salzmann (Germany)

Samuel Shimon (Irak/UK)

Witold Szablowski (Poland)

Anne Thomas (Germany)

Christian Uetz (Switzerland)

Saskia van Stein (Netherlands)

Bette Westera (Netherlands)

Oksana Zabuzhko (Ukraine)

Serhiy Zhadan (Ukraine)

Stefan Zweifel (Switzerland)